Nonfiction November 2018 Reading List

This post may include affiliate links. That means if you click and make a purchase, I may earn a small commission. Please see Disclosures for more information.

Share:

Last week, I kicked off my Nonfiction November with a look back on the nonfiction books I’ve read in 2018, and yesterday I posted what I call a “tour through a topic” with nonfiction and fiction books on Auschwitz, Joseph Mengele, and the Warsaw Zoo and occupation of Poland. This week, I’m looking ahead to my nonfiction reading plans for the month–and my list is pretty ambitious.

All of these books have been sitting on my shelf for ages and reading them will accomplish both my nonfiction goals and tick some off of my Read My Shelf Challenge.

November 2018 Reading List

Because I know that reading only nonfiction for an entire month (especially one that’s a little more stressful than most and caps off with a holiday and visitors) is probably too much, I’m planning to squeeze in a couple of fiction reads–a short one that’s been getting raves and one that I’ve been wanting to reread.

Hopefully between these and a couple of narrative nonfiction books on my list, November will turn out to be a successful reading month.

I’m linking up with Literary Quicksand, Rachel at Never Enough Novels, and Allison at My Novel Life for the TBR Mix ‘n Mingle. On the first Wednesday of each month we share the books we’re planning to read.

Nonfiction

Zeitoun

Zeitoun

Author: Dave Eggers

This true story of a man who, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, travels the city by canoe helping neighbors and animals, has been on my shelf for nearly a year. Following his efforts, Abdulrahman Zeitoun was then arrested by police officers in his home.

I loved Dave Eggers’ What Is the What, and this book promises to be just as riveting.

More info →

Buy from Amazon

 

A Circle of Quiet

A Circle of Quiet

Madeleine L’Engle shares reflections on her life and career while visiting her place of retreat. I love author memoirs and learning about how they write, find inspiration, and stay motivated. I’ve also heard this book offers resonant reflections on motherhood and identity, which are always welcome.

More info →

Buy from Amazon

 

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

If any of the books fall off my list, it will be this one. Diamond’s book on the geographical and environmental factors that shaped the modern world has been an intimidating presence on my bookshelf for a while, but I do want to at least give it shot. I have the audio version borrowed and the hardcopy on my shelf, and I’d like to try the technique of listening to the audio on higher speed while reading along in the book. I have started listening to the audio on its own, and Diamond asks some intriguing questions.

More info →

Buy from Amazon

 

Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead

Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead

I don’t always do well with “self-help” type books–the advice doesn’t stick with me in the way that personal essays or stories do–but so many people love Brene Brown that I want to see what all the fuss is about. I own both this one and Rising Strong.

More info →

Buy from Amazon

 

Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books

Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books

I have heard amazing things about this book and I’m eager to get to it during Nonfiction November. This story of a secret gathering of women in Tehran that reads forbidden Western classics promises to be a reminder that not everyone has the privilege of treating reading as merely a hobby. For many, it is a subversive, political act, worth the risk of punishment.

More info →

Buy from Amazon

 

Fiction

A whole month of nonfiction is a little too much for me, so I’m looking forward to working in these books.

 

Waiting for Eden: A novel

Waiting for Eden: A novel

After raves from both Susie at Novel Visits and Sarah at Sarah’s Book Shelves, I knew I had to squeeze in this short novel about an injured soldier, the wife who keeps vigil at his bedside, and the deceased friend and fellow soldier who watches over them both.

More info →

Buy from Amazon
The Handmaid’s Tale

The Handmaid’s Tale

I’ve read this book twice before, but it’s been a long time and I’ve been wanting to revisit it. When Catherine at The Gilmore Guide to Books suggested a reread on Twitter, it seemed like the right time–and very fitting that some other bloggers are doing a Margaret Atwood Reading Month as well. I haven’t yet watched the Hulu series, but I might give it a shot after my reread.

More info →

Buy from Amazon

 

What are you reading in November?

November 2018 Reading List - My nonfiction and fiction reads for Nonfiction November 2018, including Guns, Germs and Steel, Reading Lolita in Tehran, Zeitoun, Daring Greatly, A Circle of Quiet, The Handmaid's Tale, and Waiting for Eden.

 

November 2018 reading list for Nonfiction November. This book list includes Zeitoun, Waiting for Eden, Reading Lolita in Tehran, Guns, Germs, and Steel, Daring Greatly, A Circle of Quiet, and The Handmaid's Tale.

Share:

Similar Posts

4 Comments

  1. 1) I’ve had Guns, Germs, and Steel on my shelf for literally 10 years…I’m pretty sure I’ll never read it at this point.
    2) I’m definitely planning to squeeze in some fiction…probably after I read 1 more book (Dopesick, which just came in from the library)

  2. I have a great recommendation for your November reading! I read a really good non-fiction book recently called We Can Do It: A Community Takes on the Challenge of School Desegregation by Michael Gengler. The author does a great job of giving perspectives on the struggle of desegregating schools back in the 50’s and 60’s in Gainesville, Florida. It is inspiring hearing how a community can come together to overcome the opposition and challenges they faced. I think the author did a good job making it easy to understand the weight of the challenges the community had to face through the personal accounts sourced. The author’s website is http://www.michaelgengler.com and the book has a page as well: http://www.wecandoitbook.com if you want more info!

  3. Guns, Germs, and Steel sounds so interesting… but also so dense, that I’m not sure I’ll get to it! I’ve never read Brene Brown- but her books seem to be so well liked so I am intrigued.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.